Course Catalog 2021 – 2022

English

English 9

1059 English 9A Grammar/Comp (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

English 9A is a one-semester course designed to give students the language skills that will prepare them for college and career readiness.  In this course, students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. The focus is on reading a variety of literary and informational texts in order to construct coherent writing pieces.  The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core Standards.

1060 English 9B Grammar/Comp (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

English 9B is a one-semester course designed to give students the language skills that will prepare them for college and career readiness.  In this course, students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. The focus is on reading a variety of literary and informational texts in order to construct coherent writing pieces.  The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core Standards.

1145 Edgenuity English 9A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This English course engages students in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, students will master comprehension and literary-analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce clear, coherent writing. Students will read a range of classic texts including Homer’s,  “The Odyssey,” Shakespeare’s, Romeo and Juliet, and Richard Connell’s, “The Most Dangerous Game.”

1146 Edgenuity English 9B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This English course engages students in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, students will master comprehension and literary-analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce clear, coherent writing. Students will read a range of classic texts including Homer’s, “The Odyssey,” Shakespeare’s, Romeo and Juliet, and Richard Connell’s, “The Most Dangerous Game.”

1142 Foundations English 9A (5 credits)

English 9A is a one-semester course designed to give students the language skills that will prepare them for college and career readiness. In this course, students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. The focus is on reading a variety of literary and informational texts in order to construct coherent writing pieces.

1143 Foundations English 9B (5 credits)

English 9B is a one-semester course designed to give students the language skills that will prepare them for college and career readiness. In this course, students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. The focus is on reading a variety of literary and informational texts in order to construct coherent writing pieces.

English 10

1049 English 10A World Lit (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

English 10A is a one-semester course designed to continue and extend the language skills that will prepare students for college and career readiness.  In this course, students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. The focus is on reading a variety of literary and informational texts in order to construct coherent writing pieces.  The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

1050 English 10B World Lit (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

English 10B is a one-semester course designed to continue and extend the language skills that will prepare students for college and career readiness.  In this course, students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. The focus is on reading a variety of literary and informational texts in order to construct coherent writing pieces.  The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

1147 Edgenuity English 10A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Focused on application, this English course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Under the guidance of the eWriting software, students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays.

1148 Edgenuity English 10B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Focused on application, this sophomore English course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Under the guidance of the eWriting software, students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays.

1177 Foundations English 10A (5 credits)

English 10A is a one-semester course designed to continue and extend the language skills that will prepare students for college and career readiness.  In this course, students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. The focus is on reading a variety of literary and informational texts in order to construct coherent writing pieces.  The course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

1178 Foundations English 10B (5 credits)

English 10

English 10B is a one-semester course designed to continue and extend the language skills that will prepare students for college and career readiness.  In this course, students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. The focus is on reading a variety of literary and informational texts in order to construct coherent writing pieces.  The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

English 11

1051 English 11A American Lit (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

English 11A is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop the language skills that will prepare them for real-world situations and promote college and career readiness. English 11A is a survey of American literature from the foundations of America to the Civil War. Students study representative works from each major literary period in relation to corresponding social and political events and issues. The course will help students build skills in reading comprehension, literary response and analysis, writing strategies and application, vocabulary development, and written and oral English language conventions. Students study representative works from each major literary period in relation to corresponding social and political events and issues. The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core English-Language Arts standards.

1053 English 11B American Lit (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

English 11B is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop the language skills that will prepare them for real-world situations and promote college and career readiness. English 11B is a survey of American literature from the foundations of America to the Civil War. Students study representative works from each major literary period in relation to corresponding social and political events and issues. The course will help students build skills in reading comprehension, literary response and analysis, writing strategies and application, vocabulary development, and written and oral English language conventions. Students study representative works from each major literary period in relation to corresponding social and political events and issues. The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core English-Language Arts standards.

1149 Edgenuity English 11A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing.

1154 Edgenuity English 11B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing.

1052 Foundations English 11A (5 credits)

Foundations American Literature 11A is an English course designed to satisfy state standards, objectives and student competencies for English 11. This course contains an extensive selection of classic and contemporary works written by a variety of authors. The chronological approach of the textbook encourages students to make the connection between American Literature and events in American history. Students explore language arts skills through the use of visual clues, graphic organizers, before, during and after reading experiences and a variety of reading responses and writing activities.

1054 Foundations English 11B (5 credits)

Foundations American Literature 11B is an English course designed to satisfy state standards, objectives and student competencies for English 11. This course contains an extensive selection of classic and contemporary works written by a variety of authors. The chronological approach of the textbook encourages students to make the connection between American Literature and events in American history. Students explore language arts skills through the use of visual clues, graphic organizers, before, during and after reading experiences and a variety of reading responses and writing activities.

English 12

1056 English 12A English Lit (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

English 12A is a one-semester course designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop the language skills that will prepare them for real-world situations and promote college and career readiness. The course is intended to deliver a chronological, thematic survey of British literature starting with its foundations in Anglo-Saxon times through the Renaissance.  Students study representative works from each major literary period in relation to corresponding social and political events and issues. The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core English-Language Arts standards.

1057 English 12B English Lit (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

English 12B is a one-semester course designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop the language skills that will prepare them for real-world situations and promote college and career readiness. The course is intended to deliver a chronological, thematic survey of British literature starting with its foundations in Anglo-Saxon times through the Renaissance.  Students study representative works from each major literary period in relation to corresponding social and political events and issues. The course is required for graduation and is aligned with the Common Core English-Language Arts standards.

1155 Edgenuity English 12A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This senior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain.

1156 Edgenuity English 12B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This senior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain.

1055 Foundations English 12A (5 credits)

Foundations British Literature 12A is an English course designed to satisfy state standards, objectives and student competencies for English 12. This course contains an extensive collection of British Literature written by a variety of authors and encompasses a variety of genres. Students explore language arts skills through the use of visual clues, graphic organizers, before, during and after reading experiences and a variety of reading responses and writing activities.

1058 Foundations English 12B (5 credits)

Foundations British Literature B is an English course designed to satisfy state standards, objectives and student competencies for English 12. This course contains an extensive collection of British Literature written by a variety of authors and encompasses a variety of genres. Students explore language arts skills through the use of visual clues, graphic organizers, before, during and after reading experiences and a variety of reading responses and writing activities.

Mathematics

1009 Algebra 1A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

By the end of the course, students will use a variety of techniques to solve algebra problems drawn from real-life situations. Students will write equations, solve equations, and draw graphs. Students will consider the full range of algebraic concepts necessary to solve problems. Students will communicate their understanding as appropriate with calculations, words, diagrams, and graphs.

1010 Algebra 1B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

By the end of the course, students will use a variety of techniques to solve algebra problems drawn from real-life situations. Students will write equations, solve equations, and draw graphs. Students will consider the full range of algebraic concepts necessary to solve problems. Students will communicate their understanding as appropriate with calculations, words, diagrams, and graphs.

1067 Geometry A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

The Geometry A course is a comprehensive look at the study of geometric concepts including constructions, transformations: translations, reflections, rotations and dilations, congruence and similarity, geometric properties and polygons: triangles and quadrilaterals.  Students will further develop their ability to construct formal, logical arguments and proofs in geometric settings and problems.  Students will experiment with transformations on the Cartesian coordinate system to further their understanding of congruency and similarity in terms of rigid motions. Students will express their knowledge of the concepts by completing modeling tasks while using appropriate tools and attending to precision.  They will explain their reasoning behind the procedures and result by accurately using mathematical language and notation.  They will make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

1068 Geometry B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

The Geometry B course is a comprehensive look at the study of geometric concepts including coordinate geometry, circles, trigonometry and surface area and volume of cylinders, prisms, pyramids and spheres.  Students will be able to express geometric properties with equations.  They will apply their understanding of similarity to explore trigonometry concepts.  Students will further develop their ability to construct and defend formal, logical arguments and proofs in geometric settings and problems.  Students will use probability to make informed decisions.  Students will express their knowledge of the concepts by completing modeling tasks while using appropriate tools and attending to precision.  They will explain their reasoning behind the procedures and result by accurately using mathematical language and notation.  They will make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

1012 Algebra 2A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course is an expansion of Algebra 1. Students will learn additional methods and investigate additional topics of Algebra. Students will study operations of powers, exponents, radicals, and polynomials.

1013 Algebra 2B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course is an expansion of Algebra 1. Students will learn additional methods and investigate additional topics of Algebra. Students will study exponents, exponential and logarithmic functions.

1219 Math 1 Readiness A (5 credits)

The purpose of the Math 1 Readiness course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Common core math standards are addressed, including patterns in math, exponent rules, absolute value, order of operation, integer computations, square roots, polynomials, creating, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, determine and understand slope, basic geometric concepts, and basic statistic concepts. The course will focus on numeric and algebraic manipulation. Students will build mathematical skills that allow them to solve problems and reason logically. Students will build context and connections of the mathematics to the world around them through the use of real problems and situations. Students will be able to communicate their understanding by organizing, clarifying, and refining mathematical information for a given purpose. Students will develop the Mathematical Practice skills required for the Common Core State Standards.

1210 Math 1 Readiness B (5 credits)

The purpose of the Math 1 Readiness course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Common core math standards are addressed, including patterns in math, exponent rules, absolute value, order of operation, integer computations, square roots, polynomials, creating, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, determine and understand slope, basic geometric concepts, and basic statistic concepts. The course will focus on numeric and algebraic manipulation. Students will build mathematical skills that allow them to solve problems and reason logically. Students will build context and connections of the mathematics to the world around them through the use of real problems and situations. Students will be able to communicate their understanding by organizing, clarifying, and refining mathematical information for a given purpose. Students will develop the Mathematical Practice skills required for the Common Core State Standards.

1194 Math 1A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane.

1195 Math 1B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane

1025 Business Math A (5 credits)

Business Math A is a mathematics course that explores mathematical concepts in the business world. Students learn to use mathematics effectively as a tool in their personal and business lives by learning and reviewing mathematical operations with whole numbers, decimals, fractions, ratios, and percentages. Assessments will help students to analyze, interpret, explain, synthesize, evaluate, and communicate information.

1027 Business Math B (5 credits)

Business Math B is a mathematics course that explores mathematical concepts in the business world. Students learn to use mathematics effectively as a tool in their personal and business lives by learning and reviewing mathematical operations with whole numbers, decimals, fractions, ratios, and percentages. Assessments will help students to analyze, interpret, explain, synthesize, evaluate, and communicate information.

1234 Edgenuity Pre-Algebra A (5 credits)

This course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebra-ready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal Algebra I or Math 1 study.

1235 Edgenuity Pre-Algebra B (5 credits)

This course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebra-ready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal Algebra I or Math 1 study.

1165 Edgenuity Common Core Math 1A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane.

1166 Edgenuity Common Core Math 1B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane.

1188 Edgenuity Common Core Math 2A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. Students explore right triangles with an introduction to right-triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids.

1189 Edgenuity Common Core Math 2B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. Students explore right triangles with an introduction to right-triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids.

1204 Edgenuity Common Core Math 3A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and developing the laws of sines and cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

1205 Edgenuity Common Core Math 3B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and developing the laws of sines and cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

1217 Edgenuity Probability & Statistics A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This high-school course provides an alternative math course for students who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra II and Pre-Calculus. It begins with an in-depth study of probability, with a focus on conceptual understanding. Students then move into an exploration of sampling and comparing populations. The first semester closes with units on data distributions and data analysis—including how to summarize data sets with a variety of statistics.

1218 Edgenuity Probability & Statistics B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This high-school course provides an alternative math course for students who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra II and Pre-Calculus. It begins with an in-depth study of probability, with a focus on conceptual understanding. Students then move into an exploration of sampling and comparing populations. The first semester closes with units on data distributions and data analysis—including how to summarize data sets with a variety of statistics.

1232 Edgenuity Pre-Calculus A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. The course concludes with a short study of probability and statistics.

1233 Edgenuity Pre-Calculus B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. The course concludes with a short study of probability and statistics.

Science

1043 Earth Science A (5 credits) NCAA approved

Earth Science A is an introductory course to familiarize the student with the basic principles of earth science. It is a concept-oriented investigative approach to science. Through data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will experience the four branches of earth science: geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy.

1045 Earth Science B (5 credits) NCAA approved

Earth Science B is an introductory course to familiarize the student with the basic principles of earth science. It is a concept-oriented investigative approach to science. Through data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will experience the four branches of earth science: geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy.

1069 Integrated Science A (5 credits)

This course employs a concept-oriented investigative approach to science. Integrated Science covers topics such as heat, waves, electricity and magnetism, motion, and the conservation of energy and momentum. Students will create science drawings that accurately represent information presented to them in instructional videos. Through data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will experience branches of earth and life science.

1070 Integrated Science B (5 credits)

This course employs a concept-oriented investigative approach to science. Integrated Science covers topics such as heat, waves, electricity and magnetism, motion, and the conservation of energy and momentum. Students will create science drawings that accurately represent information presented to them in instructional videos. Through data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will experience branches of earth and life science.

1022 Biology A (with lab) (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Students will identify fundamental life processes, recognize the cause of genetic variation in a population, determine an organism’s genotype and phenotype, and the function and structure of DNA. The balance of an ecosystem and the process of evolution will be investigated. Students will explore the many levels of organization of the human body. They will also recognize how the coordinated structures and functions of organ systems allow the human body to remain relatively stable despite changes in the surrounding environment. The variety of and mechanisms available to fight disease will also be examined.  Lab Workshop Requirement

1024 Biology B (with lab) (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Students will identify fundamental life processes, recognize the cause of genetic variation in a population, determine an organism’s genotype and phenotype, and the function and structure of DNA. The balance of an ecosystem and the process of evolution will be investigated. Students will explore the many levels of organization of the human body. They will also recognize how the coordinated structures and function of organ systems allow the human body to remain relatively stable despite changes in the surrounding environment. The variety of and mechanisms available to fight disease will also be examined.  Lab Workshop Requirement

1157 Edgenuity Biology A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This compelling course engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology.

1158 Edgenuity Biology B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This compelling course engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology.

1021 Foundations Biology A (with lab) (5 credits)

Students will identify fundamental life processes, recognize the cause of genetic variation in a population, determine an organism’s genotype and phenotype, and the function and structure of DNA. The balance of an ecosystem and the process of evolution will be investigated. Students will explore the many levels of organization of the human body. They will also recognize how the coordinated structures and functions of organ systems allow the human body to remain relatively stable despite changes in the surrounding environment. The variety of and mechanisms available to fight disease will also be examined. Lab Workshop Requirement

1023 Foundations Biology B (with lab) (5 credits)

Students will identify fundamental life processes, recognize the cause of genetic variation in a population, determine an organism’s genotype and phenotype, and the function and structure of DNA. The balance of an ecosystem and the process of evolution will be investigated. Students will explore the many levels of organization of the human body. They will also recognize how the coordinated structures and functions of organ systems allow the human body to remain relatively stable despite changes in the surrounding environment. The variety of and mechanisms available to fight disease will also be examined. Lab Workshop Requirement

1118 Ecology A (5 credits) NCAA approved

Ecology A provides students with an environmental outlook related to human health and biodiversity. Students will investigate genetic engineering and the effects on the environment, biodiversity, and human impact on ecosystems.  Using data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will investigate changes in biodiversity, examine human use of different ecosystems, and make informed decisions regarding human health, biodiversity, and genetic engineering.

1119 Ecology B (5 credits) NCAA approved

Ecology B provides students with an understanding of how human activity impacts the survival, biodiversity, and environment of species. Students will investigate how species are distributed, selective pressures of evolution, and factors of species survival. Using data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will investigate differential survival of organisms, examine the earth’s rich biodiversity, and the isolation of species.

1114 Topics in Earth Science A (5 credits)

Topics in Earth Science A is designed to engage the student at a deeper level with current events and concerns related to Earth Science.  Students will investigate the greenhouse effect on natural systems, the ozone layer, and California’s fresh water supplies and uses. Through data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will experience the branches of Earth Science with an emphasis on human’s use of resources and impact on the environment especially as related to California.

1115 Topics in Earth Science B (5 credits)

Topics in Earth Science B is designed to engage the student at a deeper level with current events and concerns related to Earth Science.  Students will investigate the carbon cycle, ocean currents, biomes including rainforests and deserts. Through data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will experience the branches of Earth Science with an emphasis on human’s use of resources and impact on the environment especially as related to California.

1238 Edgenuity Physics A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA Approved

This full-year course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, including Newtonian mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students solve mathematical problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically about the physical world. The course also includes interactive virtual labs in which students ask questions and create hypotheses.

1239 Edgenuity Physics B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA Approved

This full-year course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, including Newtonian mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students solve mathematical problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically about the physical world. The course also includes interactive virtual labs in which students ask questions and create hypotheses.

Social Science

1107 World History A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Students will study the major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late 18th century through the present, including the cause and course of the two world wars. Students will trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. Students will develop an understanding of current world issues, relating them to historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students will consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.

1107 World History B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Students will study the major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late 18th century through the present, including the causes and courses of the two world wars. Students will trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. Students will develop an understanding of current world issues, relating them to historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students will consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.

1169 Edgenuity World History A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.

1170 Edgenuity World History B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.

1108 Foundations World History A (5 credits)

Students will study the major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late 18th century through the present, including the causes and courses of the two world wars. Students will trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. Students will develop an understanding of current world issues, relating them to historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students will consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.

1110 Foundations World History B (5 credits)

Students will study the major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late 18th century through the present, including the causes and courses of the two world wars. Students will trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. Students will develop an understanding of current world issues, relating them to historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students will consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.

1094 US History A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course covers the major turning points in American history with an emphasis on the 20th century.  The students will review the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals.  Students will trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement towards equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major world power.  Instruction will be delivered in the form of educational videos.

1096 US History B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course covers the major turning points in American history with an emphasis on the 20th century.  The students will review the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals.  Students will trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement towards equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major world power.  Instruction will be delivered in the form of educational videos.

1171 Edgenuity US History A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the Era of Exploration through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped U.S. history. In early units, students will assess the foundations of U.S. democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization. They will also assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus their studies on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives.

1172 Edgenuity US History B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the Era of Exploration through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped U.S. history. In early units, students will assess the foundations of U.S. democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization. They will also assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus their studies on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives.

1095 Foundations US History A (5 credits)

This course covers the major turning points in American history with an emphasis on the 20th century. The students will review the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals. Students will trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement towards equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major world power.

1097 Foundations US History B (5 credits)

This course covers the major turning points in American history with an emphasis on the 20th century. The students will review the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals. Students will trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement towards equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major world power.

1173 Edgenuity Principals of American Democracy (Civics) (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its Amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy changes. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.

1035 Foundations American Government/Civics (5 credits)

Students will deepen their understanding of the institutions of American Government through an online interactive textbook. The course should prepare students to vote, reflect on the responsibility of citizenship, and understand the many facets of American Government and to participate in the community.

1047 Economics (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Students will deepen their understanding of the economic problems and institutions of the nation and the world. The interactive textbook includes charts, graphs, timelines, content related videos, note taking tips, writing assignments, and a link to current events. The course will help the student learn to make reasoned decisions on economic issues as future citizens, workers, consumers, and business people.

1174 Edgenuity Economics (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

This semester-long course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical-thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.

1048 Foundations Economics (5 credits)

Students will deepen their understanding of the economic problems and institutions of the nation and the world. The course will help the students learn to make reasoned decisions on economic issues as future citizens, workers, consumers, and business people.

Fine Arts

1017 Art Appreciation A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

This course covers the history of art from ancient to modern times. Students will discover how social, political, and economic events have influenced the development of artistic styles. It includes information on the lives of major artists, their style and choice of mediums. Students will develop an understanding of the importance of art in our society and how it can add to our quality of life.

1018 Art Appreciation B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

This course continues the history of art from ancient to modern times. Students will learn to recognize great works of art through photographs and significant information about the work. Students will apply their factual knowledge of art along with their personal creative expression in a variety of art mediums. Students will develop an understanding and appreciation for the rich traditions of art.

1036 Color & Design (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

 Students will apply artistic processes and skill using a complete, hands-on art textbook. This course will enable students to explore art through their own creativity, using a variety of techniques and materials.

1079 Painting (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

Students will use a complete hands-on art textbook to explore the many styles and techniques of painting. This course will enable students to develop their own style through two processes: 1) the study and copying of established styles to introduce the new painter to established techniques and 2) the practicing and experimenting with various media and techniques to improve their skills. Students will study an art period in detail, enabling them to refine their artistic perception, aesthetic valuing and make connections in the historical and cultural context of the art period. Some of the California State Standards in Visual Arts, Proficient and Advanced, are recognized in this course.

Health Science

1041 Health (5 credits)

This course is designed to enable students to gain awareness, knowledge and skills for health literacy. Students will be able to gather, understand and use health information to enhance his or her health through a variety of videos, online activities, and textbook instruction. During this course, students will acquire the skills needed to make informed decisions for optimum health.

1231 Edgenuity Contemporary Health (5 credits)

This course examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Throughout the course, students examine practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, as well as nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws. This course covers issues of sex and gender identity, same-sex relationships, contraception, and meets the requirements for the California Healthy Youth Act.

Foreign Language

1180 Edgenuity Spanish 1A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

1180 Edgenuity Spanish 1B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

Students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

1222 Edgenuity Spanish 2A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

High school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.

1223 Edgenuity Spanish 2B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved, NCAA approved

High school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.

Career/Technology

1031 Careers (5 credits)

This course is designed to give students the skills they will need for pursuing a career. In this course students will learn how to look for a job, write a resume, be interviewed, dress appropriately, and fill out an application. They will explore many career opportunities and participate in a job shadow. This course will prepare students for the world of work.

1032 Careers 2 (2.5 credits)

This course introduces students to the full range of occupations in the U.S. economy, developed by the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE). From the Supreme Court Justice to robotics engineer, each cluster contains a variety of jobs that will appeal to students of widely varying interests. Students will choose a career cluster on which to focus based on their personal inventory and research completed in Careers 1. The goal of the course is to provide a link between what students learn in school and the knowledge and skills they need for success in college and careers.

1252 Personal Finance (2.5 credits)

This course introduces students to a variety of topics related to personal finance and
making good financial decisions. Students will learn how to create and monitor a budget, learn about the importance
of having good credit, how to invest and bank responsibly and learn about insurance and taxes. Students will engage
in online simulation activities to model financial scenarios similar to real life including applying for a credit card,
evaluating auto loans, making a paycheck last, and filing a Form 1040. This course will complete the
Career/Technology requirements for graduation.

1236 Edgenuity Health Science & Medical Technology A (5 credits)

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.

1237 Edgenuity Health Science & Medical Technology B (5 credits)

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.

1038 Introductory Course (1 credit)

The Introductory course is a 1-week course. This course serves as an introduction to the personalized learning model at Pacific View Charter.  It will also teach skills in online learning, digital communication, digital citizenship, Google Drive and PVCS assessments.

1198 Exit Course (1.5 credits)

This course is the final course required for graduation. It will allow students to synthesize and evaluate their learning and high school experiences to prepare for college and career.   This course will require students to create a plan for post-graduation as well as complete all of the requirements for graduation and beyond.  This culminating course will allow students to reflect on their high school experience and take steps to make concrete plans for the future.

Physical Education

1080 PE Course 1 (5 credits)

This course is designed for students to participate in physical activity under the direction of an approved adult advisor. During the course, students will demonstrate an effort to enhance their skills, improve personal responsible behavior, and exhibit respect for others while participating in movement activities. Students will research areas of fitness, biochemical principles and particular team support activities in order to develop a basic awareness of overall health and total wellness. Students will plan how to maintain an enhancing level of physical fitness for their own future and explore the benefits of exercise.

1081 PE Course 2 (5 credits)

This course is designed for students to participate in physical activity under the direction of an approved adult advisor. During the course, students will demonstrate an effort to enhance their skills, improve personal responsible behavior, and exhibit respect for others while participating in movement activities. Students will research areas of sportsmanship, fair play, rules of a game and games played in other countries in order to develop basic awareness of important issues in physical activities. Students will explore the impacts of historical events on physical related activities.

1082 PE Course 3 (5 credits)

This course is designed for students to participate in physical activity under the direction of an approved adult advisor. During the course, students will demonstrate an effort to enhance their skills, improve personal responsible behavior, and exhibit respect for others while participating in movement activities. Students will research areas of fitness, nutrition, biochemical principles and particular sports activities in order to develop a basic awareness of overall health and total wellness. Students will plan how to maintain an enhancing level of physical fitness for their own future, explore the job of a fitness trainer, and develop a personal fitness program for another individual.

1083 PE Course 4 (5 credits)

This course is designed for students to participate in physical activity under the direction of an approved adult advisor. During the course, students will demonstrate an effort to enhance their skills, improve personal responsible behavior, and exhibit respect for others while participating in movement activities. Students will research areas of fitness, careers in related fitness areas, personal achievements and the effects of aging on health and fitness. Students will plan how to maintain an enhancing level of physical fitness for their own future, explore the needs of physically challenged students, and examine ways to include them in physical activities as much as possible.

Electives

1105 World Geography A (5 credits)

This course will explore the geographical influences that affect human activity. Students will investigate different regions of the world by examining the relationships between people and their environment. Students will develop critical thinking and map skills, as well as, enhance their understanding of world regions and cultures.

1106 World Geography B (5 credits)

This course will continue to explore the geographical influences that affect human activity. Students will investigate different regions of the world by examining the relationships between people and their environment. Students will develop critical thinking and map skills, as well as, enhance their understanding of world regions and cultures.

1102 World Cultures A (5 credits)

This course introduces students to ideas, traditions, and ways of life of cultures in Africa and the Middle East. Students will investigate the development of civilizations in these areas and the factors such as geography, government, and economic systems that led to differences among them. Students will also develop an appreciation for the art, music, and literature of Africa and the Middle East.

1103 World Cultures B (5 credits)

This course introduces students to ideas, traditions, and ways of life of cultures in Asia and Oceania. Students will investigate the development of civilizations in these areas and the factors such as geography, government, and economic systems that led to differences among them. Students will also develop an appreciation for the art, music, and literature of Asia and Oceania.

1104 World Cultures C (5 credits)

This course introduces students to ideas, traditions, and ways of life of cultures in Latin America, Australia, and Canada. Students will investigate the development of civilizations in these areas and the factors such as geography, government, and economic systems that led to differences among them. Students will also develop an appreciation for the art, music, and literature of Latin America, Australia, and Canada.

1033 Child Development (5 credits)

Child Development is an introductory course exploring human development from reproduction, conception, and birth through age five. Focus is given to physical, social, intellectual, and emotional development along with basic parenting skills. In this course, students will learn effective parenting skills, explore teen pregnancy and parenthood, study prenatal development and preparing for birth, explore a child’s development through the first year, monitor a child’s development through year three, study a child’s development through age six, learn about the health, safety and special challenges of children.

1037 Commercial Art (5 credits)

Students will use a complete hands-on art textbook to explore various commercial art applications. This course will enable students to investigate the creative aspect of commercial art while recognizing its emphasis on promotion, definition, and enhancement. Many commercial art applications will be performed, either through free-hand media techniques or with computer assistance.

1042 Drawing (5 credits)

Students will refine observation skills and develop drawing techniques using a complete, hands-on art textbook. This course will enable students to fulfill three distinct artistic needs of the drawing process, including fine-tuning observation skills, becoming aware of art element relationships, and performing preliminary sketches.

1063 Exploring Literature Readiness A (5 credits)

This course employs a concept-oriented investigative approach to science. Integrated Science covers topics such as heat, waves, electricity and magnetism, motion, and the conservation of energy and momentum. Students will create science drawings that accurately represent information presented to them in instructional videos. Through data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will experience branches of earth and life science.

1064 Exploring Literature Readiness B (5 credits)

This course employs a concept-oriented investigative approach to science. Integrated Science covers topics such as heat, waves, electricity and magnetism, motion, and the conservation of energy and momentum. Students will create science drawings that accurately represent information presented to them in instructional videos. Through data analysis, demonstrations, and audio/visual media, the student will experience branches of earth and life science.

1065 Foods 1 (5 credits)

This course provides an introduction to foods and nutrition. Topics in this course include food safety, general nutrition, and personal diet evaluation. Students will also learn the fundamentals of planning, preparing, and serving simple meals. Basic equipment use and care, food purchasing, and preparation techniques will be covered.

1066 Foods 2 (5 credits)

This course is a continuation of Foods 1 which includes advanced practice in food safety, shopping, preparation, and presentation of full meals. It will include a variety of advanced food preparation techniques. Students will also investigate food preservation and storage. Foods from around the world will be included.

1192 Computer Programming with Scratch (5 credits)

This course introduces students to computer programming using the Scratch platform, a free computer programming language developed by researchers at the MIT Media Lab. The Scratch platform was designed to aid students in creative computing endeavors and provide a way for students to create a wide variety of interactive media projects – animations, stories, games, and share those projects with others in an online community. Creative computing supports the development of personal connections to computing by drawing on creativity, imagination and interests.

1071 Keyboarding (5 credits)

In this elective course, students will develop correct techniques for touch-typing in order to increase the speed and accuracy of their typing abilities. They will also be introduced to basic conventional typing practices. Timed tests that track the number of words typed per minute and the number of mistakes made during the same time period will be given regularly. A typewriter or a computer with a word processing program is needed for work at home, or the computers in the school computer lab may be utilized for this class.

1063 Exploring Literature Readiness A (5 credits)

Exploring Literature Readiness A is an elective course designed to give students the fundamental writing and reading skills that will prepare them for English 9 and 10. This course will assist students in developing practical writing and reading skills with an emphasis on literary analysis.

1064 Exploring Literature Readiness B (5 credits)

Exploring Literature Readiness B is an elective course designed to give students the fundamental writing and reading skills that will prepare them for English 9 and 10. This course will assist students in developing practical writing and reading skills with an emphasis on literary analysis.

1220 Poetry A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

This course introduces students to the poetry of various authors, styles, and themes.  Students will learn about a variety of themed poetry, focusing on two new themes per week. Students will analyze each theme and then create their own poems using that theme. Students will also develop an appreciation for poetry and the various styles and themes studied. This course will focus on twelve poetic themes: memories, poems of loss, surreal poems, myth/legend poems, love poems, the natural world poems, extended metaphor poems, reanimating dead metaphors, political poems, war poems, dream poetry, and poetry about writing.

1221 Poetry B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

This course introduces students to the poetry of various authors, styles, and structures.  The course focuses on multiple poetic structures and how structured poems are developed. Students will be taught about many types of poetic structures, focusing on two new structures per week. For each type of structure covered, a brief history will be given, including examples of specific poems, before students create their own versions of the same style. Students will also develop an appreciation for poetry and the various styles and structures studied. This course will focus on structured types of poetry, as well as various subtypes that are used as guides to create poems out of surrounding materials: traditional structures of poems, haiku, limericks and epitaphs, sonnets and villanelles, prose, odes, chance poems, concrete poems, and cut-out poems.

1216 Study Skills (2.5 credits)

This 2.5 credit elective course is designed to help students gain study skills that will prepare them for college and career. The class focuses on developing a growth mindset and helps students learn strategies to enhance success. These strategies include: time management, note-taking, outlining, reading skills, math skills, test-taking strategies and overall self-awareness of learning. After completing this course, students will master the skills to be life-long learners with a growth mindset. They will develop the math and reading skills to reduce test anxiety, be more comfortable asking for help, and develop organizational and time management skills required to prepare for college and the workplace.

1178 Edgenuity Psychology A (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

This course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

1179 Edgenuity Psychology B (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

This course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

1228 Edgenuity Sociology (5 credits) UC/A-G approved

Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, this is an engaging, one-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times.

1229 Edgenuity Strategies for Academic Success (5 credits)

Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, this one-semester course encourages students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that will help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.

1236 Edgenuity Health Science & Medical Technology A (5 credits)

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.

1236 Edgenuity Health Science & Medical Technology B (5 credits)

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.

1199 Cartooning (5 credits)

Students will apply artistic processes and skills for cartooning using a complete, hands-on art textbook. This course will enable students to explore cartooning through their own creativity, using a variety of techniques and materials. This course allows students to create their own cartoons and cartooning portfolio, it is the goal of the class to demonstrate in their own works of art a personal style.

1196 Drivers Education (5 credits)

This course is a foundation of theory for responsible driving.  Emphasis is placed upon mechanics of driving, execution of driving operations and rules of safe driving. It is aligned to the California State Standards for Drivers Education and approved by the DMV.

1209 Mythology (5 credits)

This course introduces students to the mythology of different cultures from around the world.  Students will investigate the development of myths and their relation to civilizations including the factors such as geography, history, and belief systems that led to different myths across cultures. Students will also develop an appreciation for the art, literature, and historical roots of the various cultures studied. This course will focus on six cultures from around the world: Greek and Roman civilization, Egyptian civilization, Japanese civilization, Celtic civilization, Mayan civilization, and Norse civilization

Credit Recovery
(these courses are not A-G eligible)

4012 English 9A CR (5 credits)

In this course, students will learn to use the Internet to communicate. They will explore mass media and gain an understanding of journalism and advertising practices. This course has been specifically built with the credit recovery student in mind. The course content has been appropriately grouped into smaller topics to increase retention and expand opportunities for assessment.

4013 English 9B CR (5 credits)

In this course, students will learn to use the Internet to communicate. They will explore mass media and gain an understanding of journalism and advertising practices. This course has been specifically built with the credit recovery student in mind. The course content has been appropriately grouped into smaller topics to increase retention and expand opportunities for assessment.

4014 English 10A CR (5 credits)

In this course, students will read literary works from a variety of genres, from different cultures, and from classical and modern time periods. In order to develop critical thinking skills and the ability to communicate effectively, students will be asked to respond to their readings creatively and thoughtfully, to present material orally, and to evaluate material and ideas presented not only in the literature but also in the media.

4015 English 10B CR (5 credits)

In this course, students will read literary works from a variety of genres, from different cultures, and from classical and modern time periods. In order to develop critical thinking skills and the ability to communicate effectively, students will be asked to respond to their readings creatively and thoughtfully, to present material orally, and to evaluate material and ideas presented not only in the literature but also in the media.

4016 English 11A CR (5 credits)

As students move toward the end of their high school careers, it is important to look forward and to understand how the skills they are developing in high school will transfer to college and the work place. In this course, students will understand the practical applications of strong communication skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This class will prepare students for college and beyond.

4017 English 11B CR (5 credits)

As students move toward the end of their high school careers, it is important to look forward and to understand how the skills they are developing in high school will transfer to college and the work place. In this course, students will understand the practical applications of strong communication skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This class will prepare students for college and beyond.

4018 English 12A CR (5 credits)

This is a shortened version of the standard English 12A Foundations course. Its length makes it suitable for use in summer programs and in other contexts in which instructional time and teacher time may be limited. Additional activities make it appropriate for English Language Learners. Extensive use of instructional tutorials enables the course to be shorter while maintaining high quality and the same concept load. Audio is provided for every lesson.

4019 English 12B CR (5 credits)

This is a shortened version of the standard English 12B Foundations course. Its length makes it suitable for use in summer programs and in other contexts in which instructional time and teacher time may be limited. Additional activities make it appropriate for English Language Learners. Extensive use of instructional tutorials enables the course to be shorter while maintaining high quality and the same concept load. Audio is provided for every lesson.

4000 Common Core Math 1A CR (5 credits)

The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane

4001 Common Core Math 1B CR (5 credits)

The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane

4002 Common Core Math 2A CR (5 credits)

This course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. Students explore right triangles with an introduction to right-triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids.

4123 Common Core Math 2B CR (5 credits)

This course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. Students explore right triangles with an introduction to right-triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids.

4003 Common Core Math 3A CR (5 credits)

This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and developing the laws of sines and cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

4004 Common Core Math 3B CR (5 credits)

This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and developing the laws of sines and cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

4006 US History A CR (5 credits)

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of American History. The content will focus on the origins of the nation’s democratic principles and continue through present day domestic and foreign issues that affect American society. There will be a particular emphasis on the individuals and groups that have not only been impacted by the nation’s development but those who have made contributions as well. Semester A covers the period from the Pre-Columbian Era to the Civil War.

4007 US History B CR (5 credits)

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of American History. The content will focus on the origins of the nation’s democratic principles and continue through present day domestic and foreign issues that affect American society. There will be a particular emphasis on the individuals and groups that have not only been impacted by the nation’s development but those who have made contributions as well. Semester B covers the period from Reconstruction to the Modern Era.

4025 World History A CR (5 credits)

This course is a survey of world history from prehistoric to contemporary times. Students will learn about the
socioeconomic, political, and ideological conditions of various time periods as they study historical events and cultural
achievements or world regions. Semester A covers from the beginnings of civilization to the Middle Ages.

4024 World History B CR (5 credits)

This course is a survey of world history from prehistoric to contemporary times. Students will learn about the
socioeconomic, political, and ideological conditions of various time periods as they study historical events and cultural
achievements or world regions. Semester B covers from the Renaissance and Reformation to the Contemporary Period.

4123 Economics CR (5 credits)

Students will be introduced to the basics of economic principles, and they will learn the importance of understanding different economic systems. They will also investigate how to think like an economist. Students will explore different economic systems, including the American Free Enterprise System, and they will analyze and interpret data to understand the laws of supply and demand. Students will also be presented with economic applications in today’s world. From economics in the world of business, money, banking, and finance, students will see how economics is applied both domestically and globally. Students will also study how the government is involved in establishing economic stability in the American Free Enterprise System as well as the how the U.S. economy has a global impact.

4124 Civics CR (Principals of American Government) (5 credits)

American Government is the study of the historical backgrounds, governing principles, and institutions of the government of the United States. The focus is on the principles and beliefs upon which the United States was founded and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. The principles of popular sovereignty, separation of powers, checks and balances, republicanism, federalism, and individual rights will be examined as will the roles of individuals and groups in the American political system. Students will compare the American system of government with other modern systems and assess the strengths and problems associated with the American system.

4120 Spanish 1A CR (5 credits)

This course provides students with instruction in the basics of learning the language of Spanish. This includes but is not limited to the vocabulary topics of greetings, time, dates, colors, clothing, numbers, weather, family, houses, sports, food and school. The course also introduces basic and stem-changing verbs and their formation and use in the present tense. Students also learn about interrogatives, question formation, and adjectives and their form and use, in addition to possessives, prepositions, and other grammatical structures. Finally, students will become acquainted with the Spanish-
speaking countries of the world and their cultures. Spanish 1A covers the topics: Saludos, El Dia y La Fecha, El Tiempo, La Hora, and Los Colores.

4121 Spanish 1B CR (5 credits)

This course provides students with instruction in the basics of learning the language of Spanish. This includes but is not limited to the vocabulary topics of greetings, time, dates, colors, clothing, numbers, weather, family, houses, sports, food and school. The course also introduces basic and stem-changing verbs and their formation and use in the present tense. Students also learn about interrogatives, question formation, and adjectives and their form and use, in addition to possessives, prepositions, and other grammatical structures. Finally, students will become acquainted with the Spanish-speaking countries of the world and their cultures. Spanish 1B covers the topics: Los Lugares, La Familia, La Comida, Las Actividades, and La Escuela.

4309 Psychology A CR (5 credits)

This course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

4310 Psychology B CR (5 credits)

This course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in
research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

LCFF Budget Overview for Parents